Dam Busters


The men from many anti-nazi nations of  ‘The Dam Busters’ – RAF 617 Squadron led by 24-year old Wing Commander Guy Gibson were lauded as heroes after the infamous raid in 1944. and Guy Gibson was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Dam Buster raid.
Guy Gibson’s men needed to fly specially modified Lancaster bombers  of 617 squadron which would carry the ‘bouncing bomb’ needed to be dropped from a height of 60 feet (18m), and at a ground speed of 232mph. The bomb would spin backwards across the surface of the water before reaching the dam.
The raid also established 617 Squadron as a specialist precision bombing unit, experimenting with new bomb sights, target marking techniques and colossal new ‘earthquake’ bombs developed by Barnes Wallis .On the night of 16-17 May 1943, Wing Commander Guy Gibson led 617 Squadron of the Royal Air Force on an audacious bombing raid to destroy three dams in the Ruhr valley, the industrial heartland of Germany. The mission was code-named Operation ‘Chastise’.The dams were fiercely protected. Torpedo nets in the water stopped underwater attacks and anti-aircraft guns defended them against enemy bombers. But 617 Squadron had a secret weapon: the ‘bouncing bomb’.

The RAF 617 Dam Busters Squadron was led by 24-year old Wing Commander Guy Gibson was made up of aircrew from Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the USA
The RAF 617 Dam Busters Squadron was led by 24-year old Wing Commander Guy Gibson was made up of aircrew from Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the USA

In late March 1943, a new squadron was formed to carry out the raid. 617 Squadron was led by 24-year old Wing Commander Guy Gibson was made up of aircrew from Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the USA. With one month to go before the raid, and with only Gibson knowing the full details of the operation, the squadron began intensive training in low-level night flying and navigation. They were ready for Operation ‘Chastise’.e dams. Initially code named Squadron X,

First Dam Successfully Busted 'The Möhne' in the Indus trail Ruhr in western Germany at precisely 12.28 am on May 16th., 1944.
First Dam Successfully Busted ‘The Möhne’ in the Industrial Ruhr heartland of the Nazi-War machine in western Germany at precisely 12.28 am on May 16th., 1944.

Dam Busters Lancaster Bombers Night Raid
From 9.28pm on 16 May, 133 aircrew in 19 Lancasters took off in three waves to bomb the dams. Gibson was flying in the first wave and his aircraft was first to attack the Möhne (pictured below) at 12.28am, but five aircraft had to drop their bombs before it was breached. The remaining aircraft still to drop their bombs then attacked the Eder, which finally collapsed at 1.52am. Meanwhile, aircraft from the two other waves bombed the Sorpe but it remained intact.

Air Marshal Harris (left) observes as Wing Commander Guy Gibson's crew is debriefed after the raid. resulting flooding
‘Bomber Harris‘ (left) observes as Wing Commander Guy Gibsons crew is debriefed after the raid

The three main targets were the Möhne, Eder and Sorpe dams.The Möhne dam was a curved ‘gravity’ dam and was 40m high and 650m long. There were tree-covered hills around the reservoir, but any attacking aircraft would be exposed on the immediate approach. The Eder dam was of similar construction but was an even more challenging target. Its winding reservoir was bordered by steep hills. The only way to approach would be from the north. The Sorpe was a different type of dam and had a watertight concrete core 10m wide. At each end of its reservoir the land rose steeply, and there was also a church spire in the path of the attacking aircraft.

The three main targets were the Möhne, Eder and Sorpe dams.
The three main targets were the Möhne, Eder and Sorpe dams.

Of the 133 aircrew that took part, 53 men were killed and three became prisoners of war. On the ground, almost 1,300 people were killed in the resulting flooding. Although the impact on industrial production was limited, the raid gave a significant morale boost to the people of Britain.

Guy Gibsons men needed to fly specially modified Lancaster bombers which would carry the bouncing bomb needed to be dropped from a height of 60 feet (18m), and at a ground speed of 232mph. The bomb would spin backwards across the surface of the water before reaching the dam.
Guy Gibson’s men of RAF 617 Squadron needed to fly specially modified Lancaster bombers which would carry the bouncing bomb needed to be dropped from a height of 60 feet (18 m), and at a ground speed of 232 mph. The bomb would spin backwards across the surface of the water before reaching the dam.

Source: iwm.org.uk/the-incredible-story-of-the-dambusters-raid

 

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