The End of the War in Europe – 1944 ~ 45

Things got pretty nasty towards the end of nazi Germany. here Polish pows are murdered by firing squad as the nazis pull-out in Poland and all eastern front countries - 1944-1945
Things got pretty nasty towards the end of nazi Germany. Here Polish pows are murdered by firing squad as the nazis pull-out in Poland and all eastern front countries – 1944-1945
24 January 1945: The Red Army races across Poland to the German border. The troops of the 10th Tank Corps 5th Guards Tank Army 2nd Belorussian Front occupied city
24 January 1945: The Red Army races across Poland to the German border. The troops of the 10th Tank Corps 5th Guards Tank Army 2nd Belorussian Front



Political Commissar Alexey Yeremenko leads his men into Combat. He was killed minutes after this photo was taken.1942. WW2
A Political Commissar leads his men into Combat. He was killed minutes after this photo was taken

Nazi Germanys desperate fight to the death in a Nemesis and full destruction with the Allies demand for what was after a total war, what Churchill called The ‘Unconditional Surrender.’ In an historic destruction, no, annihilation of Nazi Germany’s regime of enslavement of Europe, its monstrous, murderous pure evil war-machine .., with its hundreds of death camps. A self-destructive political philosophy, of one very evil little man. And, his bully-boy henchmens slaughter and enslavement of millions of millions of innocents in Europe. Please read the rest of this post to see how the Allied armies in late 1944 to mid 1945 ‘wringed’ that ‘chickens neck’ and annihilated what them right-wing fascist nazi assholes in Germany called their F.in ‘Third..’ F.in ‘Reich.’

After a successful offensive against the Finns on the Karelian Isthmus had culminated in the capture of Viipuri (Vyborg) on June 20, 1944, the Red Army on June 23 began a major onslaught on the Germans’ front in Belorussia. The attackers’ right wing took the bastion town of Vitebsk (Vitebskaya) and then wheeled southward across the highway from Orsha to Minsk; their left wing, under General Konstantin Konstantinovich Rokossovsky, broke through just north of the Pripet Marshes and then drove forward for 150 miles in a week, severing the highway farther to the west, between Minsk and Warsaw. Minsk itself fell to the Red Army on July 3; and, though the Germans extricated a large part of their forces from the Soviet enveloping movement, the Soviet tanks raced ahead, bypassing any attempts to block their path, and were deep into Lithuania and northeastern Poland by mid-July. Then the Soviet forces south of the Pripet Marshes struck too, capturing Lwów and pushing across the San River. This increase of pressure on the Germans enabled Rokossovsky’s mobile columns to thrust still farther westward: they reached the Vistula River, and one of them, on July 31, even penetrated the suburbs of Warsaw. The Polish underground in Warsaw thereupon rose in revolt against the Germans and briefly gained control of the city. But three SS armoured divisions arrived to suppress the revolt in Warsaw, and the Soviet Red Army stood idly by across the Vistula while the Germans crushed the insurrection. Although the Soviet halt outside Warsaw was a purposeful move, it is true that the unprecedented length and speed of the Red Army’s advance—450 miles in five weeks—had over strained the Soviet communications. The halt on the Vistula was to last six months.

Americas General Patton and The Russian Red Armys top General Zhukov, Berlin, Germany, 7 Sep 1945
Americas General Patton and The Russian Red Armys top General Zhukov, Berlin, Germany, 7 Sep 1945

On August 20, however, two Soviet thrusts were launched in another direction—against the German salient in Bessarabia. A new government came to power in Romania on August 23 and not only suspended hostilities against the U.S.S.R. but also, on August 25, declared war against Germany. This long-premeditated volte-face opened the way for three great wheeling movements by the Red Army’s left wing through the vast spaces of southeastern and central Europe: southwestward across Bulgaria, where they met no opposition; westward up the Danube Valley and over the Yugoslav frontier; and northwestward through the Carpathians into Transylvania. The Germans could only try to hold the threatened centres of communication long enough for the withdrawal of their forces from Greece and from southern Yugoslavia. Belgrade fell to a concerted action by the Red Army and Tito’s Partisan forces on October 20, 1944; and a rapid drive from the Transylvanian sector into the Hungarian Plain brought Soviet forces up to the suburbs of Budapest on November 4. Budapest, however, was stubbornly defended: by the end of the year, it was enveloped but still holding out.At the northern end of the Eastern Front, Finland had capitulate dearly in September, and the following weeks saw a series of scythelike strokes by the Red Army against the German forces remaining in Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. By mid-October the remnants of those forces were cornered in Courland, but the subsequent Soviet attempt to break through from Lithuania into East Prussia was repelled.

Operation Market Garden in Arnhem Holland in September 1944

British paratroopers in Oosterbeek- September 1944
British paratroopers in Oosterbeek during Operation Market Garden September 1944
Scherl Bilderdienst Tiger zerschlagen Brückenkopf bei Arnheim Die bei Arnheim gelandeten anglo-amerikanischen Luftlandetruppen sind von deutschen Eingreifverbänden auf engstem Raum zusammengedrängt und zum grossen Teil vernichtet worden. Deutsche Panzertruppen haben an diesem Erfolg besonders Anteil. Die ersten Gefangenen werden eingebracht. MPK-Aufnahme, PK-Kriegsberichter Höppner (Sch), 205/45 Archivvermerk: Ort Arnheim
British paratroopers captured during Operation Market Garden
Men of the 2nd Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment, of the 1st Airlanding Brigade, advance toward Arnhem, towing a 6-pounder anti-tank gun with them, 18 September.
Men of the 2nd Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment, of the 1st Airlanding Brigade, advance toward Arnhem, towing a 6-pounder anti-tank gun with them, 18 September.

The operation made massive use of airborne forces, whose tactical objectives were to secure the bridges and to allow a rapid advance by armoured ground units to consolidate north of Arnhem. The operation required the seizure of the bridges by airborne troops across the Meuse River, two arms of the Rhine (the Waal River and the Lower Rhine), together with crossings over several smaller canals and tributaries. However, this large airborne force contrasted with the ground forces being light with only one corps moving north of , XXX Corps. XXX Corps took along 5,000 vehicles full of bridging equipment and 9,000 sappers.

Operation Market Garden – Arnhem, Holland – September, 1944 ~1st Allied Airborne Division Parachute Drop During Operation Market Garden – Arnhem, Holland circa September, 1944

The Allies captured several bridges between Eindhoven and Nijmegen at the beginning of the operation. Lieutenant-General Brian Horrocks’ XXX Corps ground force advance was delayed by the initial failure of the airborne units to secure bridges at Son en Breugel and Nijmegen. German forces demolished the bridge over the Wilhelmina Canal at Son before it could be captured by the US 101st Airborne Division, although a Bailey bridgewas then built over the canal by British sappers. This delayed XXX Corps’ advance by 12 hours, however they made up the time, reaching Nijmegen on schedule. The US 82nd Airborne Division’s failure to capture the main highway bridge over the Waal River at Nijmegen before 20 September delayed the advance by 36 hours. XXX Corps had to seize the bridge themselves instead of speeding over a captured bridge onward to Arnhem, where the British paratroopers were still holding the north end of the bridge.
At the northern point of the airborne operation, the British 1st Airborne Division initially encountered strong resistance. The delays in capturing the bridge at Nijmegen and constructing a Bailey bridge at Son gave time for German forces (the 9th SS panzer infantry and 10th SS panzer infantry Divisions, which were in the Arnhem area at the start of the jump) to organise their counterattack. A small British force managed to capture the north end of the Arnhem road bridge, denying use of the intact bridge to German forces. After the ground forces failed to relieve the paratroopers on time, they were overrun on 21 September. At the same time that XXX Corps’ tanks moved over the Nijmegen bridge, 36 hours late, after seizing it from the Germans, the British paratroopers at the Arnhem bridge were capitulating, unable to hold on any longer.[The remainder of the British 1st Airborne Division was trapped in a small pocket west of the Arnhem bridge, which was evacuated on 25 September after sustaining heavy casualties.

A 9th SS Sd.Kfz. 250 half-track in action at Oosterbeek. Notice the supply parachute in the background.
A 9th SS Sd.Kfz. 250 half-track in action at Oosterbeek. Notice the supply parachute in the background. Source: Wikipedia

Battle of the Bulge – Ardenne, France ~December 1944

British Air Marshal Cunningham's RAF Fighter Command in their ground attack fighters like this Hawker Typhoon pictured thwarted the last ditch attempt in the Ardenne with huge loses for the Germans in late December 1944 early January 1945 Battle of the Bulge  failed and last WW2 German Wehrmacht offensive.
RAF Fighter Command in their ground attack fighters like this Hawker Typhoon pictured thwarted the last ditch attempt in the Ardenne with huge loses for the Germans in late December 1944 early January 1945 Battle of the Bulge
Soldiers of US 1st Army hacking at frozen ground to dig foxholes near their machine gun position during a lull, left, and Allied aircraft vapor trails in skies above US soldier unloading a jeep outside a farmhouse in the Ardennes Forest
Soldiers of US 1st Army hacking at frozen ground to dig foxholes near their machine gun position during a lull during the battle in the French and Belgian Ardenne forest
Members of the 117th Infantry Regiment, 30th Infantry Division, move past a destroyed American M5
Members of the 117th Infantry Regiment, 30th Infantry Division, move past a destroyed American M5 “Stuart” tank Circa 23rd. of January, 1945.

The situation might well have continued until the spring thaw had the German High Command not launched the Battle of the Bulge on 16 December 1944. The land offensive was to improve the German military position by capturing Antwerp and separating the British Army from United States Army forces. Part of the planning for the German land operation required the attack to be conducted under the cover of bad winter weather, which kept the main Allied asset, the Tactical Air Forces, on the ground. It initially succeeded, but the weather also grounded the Luftwaffe for the most part. Nevertheless, the Luftwaffe did manage to put 500 aircraft into the air on 16 December, more than had been achieved for a long time. This first day had been the originally planned date for the strike against Allied airfields, named Operation Bodenplatte. However, the weather proved particularly bad and operations were shut down.

The German plan Map showing the swelling of
The German plan Map showing the swelling of “the Bulge” as the German offensive progressed creating the nose-like salient during 16–25 December 1944.

The offensive achieved surprise and much initial success. To counter the attack from the air, the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) handed operational control of its XXIX Tactical Air Command and part of its Ninth Air Force, under the command of Major General Hoyt Vandenberg, to the RAF and Arthur Coningham. On 23 December, the RAF Second Tactical Air Force provided the American forces with much needed support, and helped prevent a German capture of Malmedy and Bastogne. This left the Germans with only the logistical bottleneck of St. Vith to support their operations. The German attack faltered.The Luftwaffe had been far from absent over the front in December. It flew several thousand sorties over the theatre. Its encounters with the RAF and USAAF had meant heavy losses in materiel and pilots. On the eight days of operations between 17 and 27 December 1944, 644 fighters were lost and 227 damaged. This resulted in 322 pilots killed, 23 captured and 133 wounded. On the three days of operations 23–25 December, 363 fighters were destroyed. In September 1944, Adolf Hitler resolved to recover Germany’s deteriorating fortunes by launching an offensive in the West which  was a large-scale ground attack operation in the Ardennes.  Which the American force stationed their named The Battle of the Bulge, which began 16 December 1944. However, the same bad weather that prevented the RAF and USAAF from supporting their own ground forces also prevented the Luftwaffe from carrying out the operation. It was therefore not launched until 1 January 1945. By this time, the German Army had lost momentum owing to Allied resistance and clearing weather, which allowed Allied Air Forces to operate.
British Air Marshal Cunningham’s RAF Fighter Command in their ground attack fighters like the new Tempest and Hawker Typhoons thwarted the last ditch attempt in the Ardenne region of France with huge loses for the Germans they could ill afford. It failed and was the last WW2 German Wehrmacht offensive. Cunningham’s RAF and USAAF Fighter Commands ground attack fighter aircraft thwarted this last ditch attempt by the Nazis in the 1940 ‘Fall of France’ fame Ardenne forest region. Which resulted huge loses for the Germans in men, tanks and aircraft that they simply could not replace and only hastened Hitlers own demise and full destruction and annihilation of  Nazi Germany’s war-machine.
The V1 &V2 missiles ~ Hitlers ‘Wunder Weapons’ – 1945
Along with the V1 ‘Doodlebug’ that hit targets in England and on the western front such as the Dutch port of Antwerp  V1 which was only effective short range, a crude pilot-less jet propelled missile that lacked accuracy and deployment.., where’s the rocket propelled V2  was extremely long range and thought impossible to destroy unless on the ground from its secret launch pads. One  very famous  V2  launch pad that was never fully operational was in Brittany, France near the U-boat bomb proof base in the port of Brest. Constructed over a long period of time with eastern European slave labourers and designed to be what was thought; indestructible. Which was therefore bombed into oblivion by the USAAF. Succeeding Malta as the most bombed place in WW2. Claimed by some to have been constructed on Europe’s western most point in the North Atlantic to destroy New York with was thought to be a very crude atomic bomb. Peenemünde missile research facility in the Baltic sea was bombed into oblivion by the RAF in August, 1943.  So had to relocate to Nordhausen in the Harz mountains region of central Germany to fully develop and produce the V-2 rocket. Launched from V2 launch pads there they were still capable of hitting targets as far away as London.
Not ‘The Beginning of The End’~But, The End of the End
Although Hitler claimed he offered new hope in the failing Third Reich to his Generals and his disillusioned German people and even tried to persuade a few that he could still win the war as late as early 1945. By which time the huge Russian Red Army were already in Germany and Monty and Pattern had fully established bridgeheads over the river Rhine and advancing along tyhe Road to  Berlin on the Western front. 

Soviet flag flies over the German Government buildings - The Reichstag in devastated Berlin circa May,
Soviet flag flies over the German Government buildings – The Reichstag in devastated Berlin circa May, 1945

His ‘secret weapon’ claim that he made to all his brainwashed henchmen and foolish German people alike never came off and remained an allusion.
Much like the whole philosophy of Nazism and Hitler the man himself.., An evil delusional paranoid little man. His end culminating with his suicide. Hitler shot himself with his Walter PPK pistol at 3:30pm on the afternoon of April 30th.,  1945. Responsible for the estimated 50 million deaths, mostly innocent civilians in Europe alone. Victory in Europe or VE Day, came several days later after the formal acceptance by the Allies of Nazi Germany’s unconditional surrender of its armed forces on the 8th. of May, 1945 and the end of the World War II in Europe.

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