Talken News

Donner meat-mad-man
Talke is a village in Staffordshire, England, four miles north-west of Newcastle-under-Lyme.
Talke is a village in Staffordshire, England, four miles north-west of Newcastle-under-Lyme.

The village of Talke is in Staffordshire, England, four miles north-west of Newcastle-under-Lyme. There once was a fruit and veg. shop and Post Office called ‘Vince’s.’  This store or typically northerners 1970s con-vience shop was in Unity Way, Talke. Which was, and still is in a rather shabby council estate built in the 1970’s. Full of unemployed young men abusing and selling drugs, over-weight single mothers on state benefits and the location of Vince’s rather disgusting cockroach-rat-infested shop full of out-of-date shite food that the locals snapped up at Vince’s super-lowest-low-prices!‘Get-it-while-u-can!’ he would shout out around the streets of Talke from his jam packed shitty little van full of crap food and stuffed full of other bollox you didn’t really want! But, he some how managed get you buy it off him! The Cunt! Vince’s other favourite saying and key to his business success of his shop and life-long motto of his v. v. surprising and rather amazingly long existence as a very dodgy food retailer and a credit to his rather unusual business acumen was:
“Where There’s Mold? There’s GOLD!”

It was open during the 1980’s and early 1990’s. After which it closed. Thank F.! Probably after a Health & Safety law violation and inevitable inspection by a local government Environmental Health Officer. Who most probably, and almost certainly, condemned the place and had Vince’s fruit & veg. shop shut down with immediate effect! And then had Vince banged up for 50 years for breaking every F.in’ Consumer Health act and local and national government’s directives and laws on food hygiene and consumer protection since the F.in’ early 1820’s!Vince’s old shop is now ‘Manhattan Pizza.’ A rather horrible, Pakistani fast-food outlet selling over priced 32″ inch Pizzas, horrible greasy, v. soggy, & v. thin French fries and disgusting Donner Kebabs to all  the TV coach potatoes in the local area and in the vicinity of Unity Way council estate.Donner Kebabs consist of one small pita bread stuffed full with the most fowl mix of dog-food like Donner ‘meat’ (If u can call that shite meat!) cabbage, so called ‘mixed salads’ and other bollox.

All christened with the most fowl super red-hot chilli sauce. That only absolute idiots or, pissed out of their minds nut-bags would dare ever attempt to put in their mouths. Or, even contemplate eating. As it burns the F. out of your throat and sets fire to your belly, as well as the horrid greasy Donner meat food poisoning you are most certainly gonna experience soon after the consumption of a Donner Kebab dirt-box on a post-piss-up-take-away-filthy-feed. As it is left spit roasting for days. Vertically. Like some deranged elephant’s foot or lower leg. Going round and around for days.
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Total War ~ WWII in the Pacific ~ 1942 ~ 45

American supplies being landed at Iwo Jima
Pacific February 1942 – July 1945
Episode 23 – The World At War
American supplies being landed at Iwo Jima
American supplies being landed at Iwo Jima
37mm Gun fires against cave positions at Iwo Jima
37mm Gun fires against cave positions at Iwo Jima
 Injured US Marines being treated on the sand, at an aid station on Iwo Jima (Iwo To), one of the Japanese volcanic islands, in 1945
Injured US Marines being treated on the sand, at an aid station on Iwo Jima (Iwo To), one of the Japanese volcanic islands, in 1945
US Marines capture Japanese flags on Pacific Island of Iwo Jima in the War in the Pacific in February 1945
US Marines capture Japanese flags on Pacific Island of Iwo Jima in the War in the Pacific in February 1945
U.S. Marines of the 28th Regiment of the Fifth Division raise the American flag atop Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima circa 23 February 1945 (Joe Rosenthal)
U.S. Marines  raise the American flag atop Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima February 1945

 

 Lt Walter Chewning, a catapult officer, is shown climbing up the side of a F6F to help the pilot, Ens. Byron Johnson, out of the flaming cockpit, after a crash landing on the flight deck of the USS Enterprise. The vessel was en route to attack Makin Island in the Pacific, November 1943
Lt Walter Chewning, a catapult officer, is shown climbing up the side of a F6F to help the pilot, Ens. Byron Johnson, out of the flaming cockpit, after a crash landing on the flight deck of the USS Enterprise. The vessel was en route to attack Makin Island in the Pacific, November 1943 
 American soldiers pictured alongside a rescued Japanese child in Saipan, July 1944
American soldiers pictured alongside a rescued Japanese child in Saipan, July 1944
 Working cautiously near heavily damaged tanks, a California National Guardsman methodically sweeps for mines
Working cautiously near heavily damaged tanks, a California National Guardsman methodically sweeps for mines
 Emerging with his hands held in the air, this man was the first of 20 Japanese to come out of a cave on Iwo Jima, on April 5, 1945. The group had been hiding for several days
Emerging with his hands held in the air, this man was the first of 20 Japanese to come out of a cave on Iwo Jima, on April 5, 1945. The group had been hiding for several days
 Pictured in July 1944, troops and vehicles en route for the invasion of Cape Sansapor, New Guinea
Pictured in July 1944, troops and vehicles en route for the invasion of Cape Sansapor, New Guinea
 The Battle of Okinawa in April-June 1945: US Marines take cover while a Bazooka operator looks for a target
The Battle of Okinawa in April-June 1945: US Marines take cover while a Bazooka operator looks for a target
 Flamethrower troops engulf a barren hillside with fire
Flamethrower troops engulf a barren hillside with fire
 Battle-weary Marine: Relieved from the front lines after 12 days of fighting the enemy in Okinawa is Marine Private First Class Harry Kizierian, June 2, 1945
Battle-weary Marine: Relieved from the front lines after 12 days of fighting the enemy in Okinawa is Marine Private First Class Harry Kizierian, June 2, 1945

Before the start of the war in the Pacific, Japan attacked Peal Harbor, the American military base located on the island of Oahu in Hawaii, because America had stopped trade of oil and other materials to Japan. After this surprise attack, the US declared war on Japan on December 8, 1941 – one day after the attack – and joined the conflict. This marked the beginning of World War II in the Pacific Theatre.

A demolition crew from the 6th Marine Division watches dynamite charges explode and destroy a Japanese cave. Okinawa, May 1945
A demolition crew from the 6th Marine Division watches dynamite charges explode and destroy a Japanese cave. Okinawa, May 1945

In 1942, the Japanese Empire was operating at the peak of its powers, attacking and occupying positions throughout the Pacific Ocean, ranging from Alaska to India. In a bid to stem the Japanese advance, the US military decided on a strategy of ‘island-hopping’ – fighting for control of strategic islands along a path toward the Japanese home islands, bringing American bombers within range and preparing for a possible invasion. The battles were bloody and conditions for prisoners-of-war were woeful. Japanese soldiers fought the island landings fiercely, killing many Allied soldiers and sometimes making desperate, last-ditch suicidal attacks. By early 1945, leapfrogging US forces had advanced as far as Iwo Jima and Okinawa, within 340 miles of mainland Japan, at a great cost to both sides. On Okinawa alone, during 82 days of fighting, about 100,000 Japanese troops and 12,510 Americans were killed, and somewhere between 42,000 and 150,000 Okinawan civilians died as well. Eventually the war would cease after the US detonated two nuclear weapons over the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6 and 9, 1945, respectively. It was the first time atomic weapons were used in warfare and resulted in the death of about 200,000 people (although estimates vary widely).

 African American Marines, attached to the Third Ammunition Company, in Saipan. Riding the captured bicycle is Pfc. Horace Boykin with, from left, Cpl. Willis T. Anthony, Pfc. Emmitt Shackelford, and Pfc. Eugene Purdy in June 1944. The Battle of Saipan was the first time black US Marines saw action in World War II
African American Marines, attached to the Third Ammunition Company, in Saipan. Riding the captured bicycle is Pfc. Horace Boykin with, from left, Cpl. Willis T. Anthony, Pfc. Emmitt Shackelford, and Pfc. Eugene Purdy in June 1944. The Battle of Saipan was the first time black US Marines saw action in World War II
 Injured prisoners shown surrounded by American troops
Injured prisoners shown surrounded by American troops
 A Japanese tank and soldiers. Honour-bound, many Japanese soldiers fought to the death rather than surrender
A Japanese tank and soldiers. Honour-bound, many Japanese soldiers fought to the death rather than surrender
 Heads bowed at the burial of Private First Class Mike Fenton, Okinawa, in May 1945. Fenton was killed in a Japanese counterattack
Heads bowed at the burial of Private First Class Mike Fenton, Okinawa, in May 1945. Fenton was killed in a Japanese counterattack
 A ruined Japanese tank smoulders in the background
A ruined Japanese tank smoulders in the background
 US troops hold a Japanese flag captured in July 1944 during the Battle of Saipan
US troops hold a Japanese flag captured in July 1944 during the Battle of Saipan
 USS Tennessee bombards Okinawa with her enormous guns, as troops are carried to the invasion beaches
USS Tennessee bombards Okinawa with her enormous guns, as troops are carried to the invasion beaches
 Tanks on Okinawa work with the 96th Infantry Division on April 1, 1945. The battle was gruesome but paved the way for an allied victory in the region
Tanks on Okinawa work with the 96th Infantry Division on April 1, 1945. The battle was gruesome but paved the way for an allied victory in the region
U.S. Marines of the 28th Regiment of the Fifth Division raise the American flag atop Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima circa 23 February 1945 (Joe Rosenthal)
U.S. Marines of the 28th Regiment of the Fifth Division raise the American flag atop Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima circa 23 February 1945 (Joe Rosenthal)

Source: Media Drum Images/ Royston Leonard

 

Uncle Pete & Vic Reeves on British TV in 1994

Vic Reeves Big Night Out

His long-running Charlie Chuck stage act often involved the destruction of a drum kit and was peppered by references to fantasy characters including One Eyed Dog, Cakey Pig and a Donkey. The words “Donkey!” and “Woof! Bark! Donkey!” shouted out more-or-less at random had been part of his Charlie Chuck act and became his ‘Uncle Peter’ catchphrases on the Reeves & Mortimer TV shows. As a result of these TV appearances, Paul McCartney became a fan and invited Chuck to perform at one of his birthday parties.

In 2001, he appeared as his Charlie Chuck character in a series of TV ads for Cadbury’s Double Decker chocolate bars.


He starred in the BBC Two TV series The Smell of Reeves and Mortimer. He appeared performing his Charlie Chuck character act, but was always referred to on-screen as ‘Uncle Peter.’

Dam Busters


The men from many anti-nazi nations of  ‘The Dam Busters’ – RAF 617 Squadron led by 24-year old Wing Commander Guy Gibson were lauded as heroes after the infamous raid in 1944. and Guy Gibson was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Dam Buster raid.
Guy Gibson’s men needed to fly specially modified Lancaster bombers  of 617 squadron which would carry the ‘bouncing bomb’ needed to be dropped from a height of 60 feet (18m), and at a ground speed of 232mph. The bomb would spin backwards across the surface of the water before reaching the dam.
The raid also established 617 Squadron as a specialist precision bombing unit, experimenting with new bomb sights, target marking techniques and colossal new ‘earthquake’ bombs developed by Barnes Wallis .On the night of 16-17 May 1943, Wing Commander Guy Gibson led 617 Squadron of the Royal Air Force on an audacious bombing raid to destroy three dams in the Ruhr valley, the industrial heartland of Germany. The mission was code-named Operation ‘Chastise’.The dams were fiercely protected. Torpedo nets in the water stopped underwater attacks and anti-aircraft guns defended them against enemy bombers. But 617 Squadron had a secret weapon: the ‘bouncing bomb’.

The RAF 617 Dam Busters Squadron was led by 24-year old Wing Commander Guy Gibson was made up of aircrew from Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the USA
The RAF 617 Dam Busters Squadron was led by 24-year old Wing Commander Guy Gibson was made up of aircrew from Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the USA

In late March 1943, a new squadron was formed to carry out the raid. 617 Squadron was led by 24-year old Wing Commander Guy Gibson was made up of aircrew from Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the USA. With one month to go before the raid, and with only Gibson knowing the full details of the operation, the squadron began intensive training in low-level night flying and navigation. They were ready for Operation ‘Chastise’.e dams. Initially code named Squadron X,

First Dam Successfully Busted 'The Möhne' in the Indus trail Ruhr in western Germany at precisely 12.28 am on May 16th., 1944.
First Dam Successfully Busted ‘The Möhne’ in the Industrial Ruhr heartland of the Nazi-War machine in western Germany at precisely 12.28 am on May 16th., 1944.

Dam Busters Lancaster Bombers Night Raid
From 9.28pm on 16 May, 133 aircrew in 19 Lancasters took off in three waves to bomb the dams. Gibson was flying in the first wave and his aircraft was first to attack the Möhne (pictured below) at 12.28am, but five aircraft had to drop their bombs before it was breached. The remaining aircraft still to drop their bombs then attacked the Eder, which finally collapsed at 1.52am. Meanwhile, aircraft from the two other waves bombed the Sorpe but it remained intact.
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Wolfe, Washington & The French and Indian War

Last of the Mohicans Movie still image set during the North American colonies French and Indian War of 1763
Montcalm attempts to stop native warriors from attacking the British. A number of British soldiers were killed after the Siege of Fort William Henry.
Montcalm attempts to stop native warriors from attacking the British. A number of British soldiers were killed after the Siege of Fort William Henry.

The French and Indian War of 1754 – 1763 pitted the colonies of British America against those of New France, each side supported by military units from the parent country and by American Indian allies.

1755- The Territory of the US During the French-Indian Wars
1755- The Territory of the US During the French-Indian Wars

In the 1700s the British and the French began to show interest in the Ohio River Valley.  Both countries viewed the valley as theirs. The French had a fur trade with Native Americans in the region, and had no interest in sharing their business with the British settlers.
The french built a chain of forts from Lake Ontario south to the Ohio River in order to protect their claims in the valley. The British responded by starting to build a fort in what is now Western Pennsylvania. The French seized the site before they could finish. They later built their own fort on it naming it Fort Duquesne.
The Ohio River Valley
In 1754 the governor of Virginia sent a Militia, lead by George Washington, to drive out the French. After Marching to Fort Duquesne  Washington made a fort of his own called Fort  Necessity.The fort was soon attacked by the French and their Native American Allies. The combined army won the battle and forced Washington’s soldiers to surrender. They were later released by the French and returned to Virginia.
Early French Success
The first four years saw nothing but severe reverses for the British regulars and American colonials, primarily because of superior French land forces in the New World. Braddock was killed and his army scattered in July 1755 when the force was ambushed while approaching Fort Duquesne. In 1756 the defenders of Fort Oswego on Lake Ontario were obliged to surrender, as were the defenders of Fort William Henry near Lake Champlain in 1757. Lord Loudoun’s amphibious expedition from New York City against the great French fortress of Louisbourg on Cape Breton Island ended in dismal failure that year. In July 1758 Gen. James Abercrombie attacked the French stronghold at the northern end of Lake George, Fort-Carillon (later renamed Fort Ticonderoga). Despite outnumbering the French defenders under Gen. Louis-Joseph de Montcalm-Grozon, marquis de Montcalm, almost four to one, Abercrombie’s army was almost destroyed. Moreover, the frontier settlements in what are now central New York, central Pennsylvania, western Maryland, and western Virginia were deserted while thousands of families fled eastward in panic to escape the hostilities.

The Redcoats - The Soldiers of the British Army
The Redcoats – The Soldiers of the British Army

British Advantages And Victory
Under these circumstances, the French tide in North America reached its crest by the end of 1757. In 1758 Amherst captured Louisbourg. Soon afterwards, John Bradstreet compelled the garrison of Fort Frontenac to capitulate, and that same year Forbes and Henry Bouquet brought about the fall of Fort Duquesne. The following year Sir William Johnson forced the surrender of Fort Niagara. Amherst pushed the French out of Fort-Carillon and Crown Point. The climax came with the British victory at the Battle of Quebec (September 13, 1759). Montcalm, were fatally wounded. Faced with hopeless odds, on September 8, 1760, the governor-general, the Marquis de Vaudreuilt was obliged to surrender not only his last stronghold, Montreal, but all of Canada. Thus, the North American phase of the Seven Years’ War came to a close.
British Advantages And Victory
Under these circumstances, the French tide in North America reached its crest by the end of 1757. In 1758 Amherst captured Louisbourg. Soon afterwards, John Bradstreet compelled the garrison of Fort Frontenac to capitulate, and that same year Forbes and Henry Bouquet brought about the fall of Fort Duquesne. The following year Sir William Johnson forced the surrender of Fort Niagara. Amherst pushed the French out of Fort-Carillon and Crown Point. The climax came with the British victory at the Battle of Quebec (September 13, 1759). Montcalm attempts to stop native warriors from attacking the British. A number of British soldiers were killed after the Siege of Fort William Henry. Montcalm, were fatally wounded. Faced with hopeless odds, on September 8, 1760, the governor-general, the Marquis de Vaudreuilt was obliged to surrender not only his last stronghold, Montreal, but all of Canada. Thus, the North American phase of the Seven Years’ War came to a close.
Wolfe and The Battle of Quebec
General James Wolfe, (born Jan. 2, 1727, Westerham, Kent, Eng.—died Sept. 13, 1759, Quebec), Ccommander of the British army at the capture of Quebec from the French in 1759, a victory that led to British supremacy in Canada.

Battle of the Plains of Abraham Part of the French and Indian War The Death of General Wolfe by Benjamin West. Oil on canvas, 1770
The Battle of Quebec and the Plains of Abraham  Part of the French and Indian War The Death of General Wolfe by Benjamin West. Oil on canvas, 1770

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Veni Vidi Vici ~ I came I saw I conquered Julius Ceasers Failed Invasion of Britannia in 55 BC

The Seven Sisters chalk cliffs and coastguard cottages, South Downs Way, South Downs National Park, East Sussex, England, UK

Julius Caesar landed in Britain on August 26th, 55 BC.
Veni ~ Vidi ~ Vici ?! I came, I saw, I conquered?!

'I came, I saw, I conquered.' Julius Caesar circa 47 BC
‘I came, I saw, I conquered.’ Julius Caesar circa 47 BC

He came.., yeah, He saw, too true! But he certainly didn’t conquer us here in the UK! In 55 BC his planned Invasion of what the Romans called ‘Britannia’ Julius Ceaser completely failed to invade fortress Britain and left empty handed and went back home to Rome without any plunder, slaves or brave tales of Ulysses. I believe he’d probably have said just like the Welsh writer GBS – George Bernard Shaw said of the Giants Causeway in Northern Ireland ~ and Ireland was one place the Romans never ever  bothered going to see for they never set foot on Irish soil in their long history or in the very least never ever settled or lived there. (The same good reason why like millions of others in Ireland then, my forefathers left for London,England over 100 years ago to start a new life here). He may have said to save pride to his Friends Romans & Citizens as did George Bernard Shaw of the Giants Causeway in Northern Ireland:

‘Worth Seeing. Not Worth Going To Sea.’

The de facto – pardon the pun –  forgive me for my awful Latin, (which I’ve never unfortunately to my own demise, studied at school). The Latin phrase I think, possibly, maybe, correct me if I’m wrong.., should read more like this:
Veni, Vidi, ~ Et non Feci Vici Britania ~ de facto Romanes Eunt Domus!
I came, I saw,  Didn’t Conquer Britannia ~ in fact The Romans Went Home!

And didn’t return for over 100 years. Until the Roman Emperor Claudius over one hundred years later in 43 AD., Who after a very long hard fight with the barbaric tribes of Britainia with a huge invasion fleet and massive army from all over the Roman Empire the largest ever amassed in the ancient world.., who eventually conquered the British tribes well over 100 years later with no easy short battle of the kind battle Julius Ceaser was accustomed.

A Gaulish chieftain named Commius was sent across the Channel to enlist support for the Romans among the British tribes, while a trusted officer took a fast galley to reconnoitre the coast. Caesar assembled eighty ships at Boulogne to carry two legions, the Seventh and the Tenth, plus irregulars, altogether some 12,000 men. The cavalry and their horses were to sail separately from Ambleteuse, a few miles north. After waiting for a wind the Roman ships left Boulogne in the early hours of August 26th and came in sight of the white cliffs of Dover around 9am. The cliffs were bristling with menacing British warriors, horsemen and war chariots. It was obviously no place to land, but Caesar waited for hours offshore for the cavalry, which had got penned in Ambleteuse by tide and wind. In the afternoon the Roman fleet sailed north-east without them to pass the South Foreland and come in sight of the long stretch of flat shore to the north. The Britons moved along on land to keep pace.The Roman ships drew in and anchored offshore, probably about where Deal is now, and the legionaries were faced with wading to land, burdened with weapons and gear, while the Britons threw javelins at them and galloped menacingly to and fro on the beach. It was not an agreeable prospect and the soldiers hung back until the eagle-bearer of the Tenth jumped into the sea and shouted to his comrades to follow him and defend the standard. This they did and more and more of the Romans struggled through the waves to the beach. After savage fighting, the legionaries managed to form up, charge the Britons and drive them in flight. With no cavalry this could not be followed up and the Romans made camp.

Roman Roads of Britain - Britannia - circa 150 AD
Roman Roads of Britain – Britannia – circa 150 AD


The Britons sent emissaries to Caesar to sue for peace, along with Commius with his tail between his legs. Caesar took hostages from them and after four days, on the 30th, the cavalry transports at last appeared, but were blown away by a sudden fierce storm and forced back to Gaul. The gale coincided with an exceptionally high tide and many of Caesar’s ships dragged their anchors and were wrecked on the beach. The Britons took note and started to muster their forces again. The Romans began repairing the ships, but now they were short of food. Parties ventured into the countryside to reap corn and gather supplies, but legionaries of the Seventh were ambushed by British chariots and horsemen. Fortunately for the Romans, the attack raised such a cloud of dust that Caesar saw it from the camp and hurried up with reinforcements. After several days of incessant rain Caesar managed to bring the British to a pitched battle, which was what Roman commanders always wanted against a barbarian and comparatively undisciplined enemy. The British were defeated with heavy casualties, but again could not be effectively pursued. Caesar had had enough. He embarked his men on the ships and sailed back to Gaul.

Caesar tried again the following year, launching a stronger and better prepared force of five legions on a second expedition, which carried him across the Thames at Brentford, but again the weather was abominable and gales played havoc with his ships and supplies. After concluding a face-saving treaty with the local British king he returned to Gaul once more. It was almost another hundred years before the Romans actually conquered Britain, in 43 AD.