Total War ~ WWII in the Pacific ~ 1942 ~ 45

American supplies being landed at Iwo Jima
Pacific February 1942 – July 1945
Episode 23 – The World At War
American supplies being landed at Iwo Jima
American supplies being landed at Iwo Jima
37mm Gun fires against cave positions at Iwo Jima
37mm Gun fires against cave positions at Iwo Jima
 Injured US Marines being treated on the sand, at an aid station on Iwo Jima (Iwo To), one of the Japanese volcanic islands, in 1945
Injured US Marines being treated on the sand, at an aid station on Iwo Jima (Iwo To), one of the Japanese volcanic islands, in 1945
US Marines capture Japanese flags on Pacific Island of Iwo Jima in the War in the Pacific in February 1945
US Marines capture Japanese flags on Pacific Island of Iwo Jima in the War in the Pacific in February 1945
U.S. Marines of the 28th Regiment of the Fifth Division raise the American flag atop Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima circa 23 February 1945 (Joe Rosenthal)
U.S. Marines  raise the American flag atop Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima February 1945

 

 Lt Walter Chewning, a catapult officer, is shown climbing up the side of a F6F to help the pilot, Ens. Byron Johnson, out of the flaming cockpit, after a crash landing on the flight deck of the USS Enterprise. The vessel was en route to attack Makin Island in the Pacific, November 1943
Lt Walter Chewning, a catapult officer, is shown climbing up the side of a F6F to help the pilot, Ens. Byron Johnson, out of the flaming cockpit, after a crash landing on the flight deck of the USS Enterprise. The vessel was en route to attack Makin Island in the Pacific, November 1943 
 American soldiers pictured alongside a rescued Japanese child in Saipan, July 1944
American soldiers pictured alongside a rescued Japanese child in Saipan, July 1944
 Working cautiously near heavily damaged tanks, a California National Guardsman methodically sweeps for mines
Working cautiously near heavily damaged tanks, a California National Guardsman methodically sweeps for mines
 Emerging with his hands held in the air, this man was the first of 20 Japanese to come out of a cave on Iwo Jima, on April 5, 1945. The group had been hiding for several days
Emerging with his hands held in the air, this man was the first of 20 Japanese to come out of a cave on Iwo Jima, on April 5, 1945. The group had been hiding for several days
 Pictured in July 1944, troops and vehicles en route for the invasion of Cape Sansapor, New Guinea
Pictured in July 1944, troops and vehicles en route for the invasion of Cape Sansapor, New Guinea
 The Battle of Okinawa in April-June 1945: US Marines take cover while a Bazooka operator looks for a target
The Battle of Okinawa in April-June 1945: US Marines take cover while a Bazooka operator looks for a target
 Flamethrower troops engulf a barren hillside with fire
Flamethrower troops engulf a barren hillside with fire
 Battle-weary Marine: Relieved from the front lines after 12 days of fighting the enemy in Okinawa is Marine Private First Class Harry Kizierian, June 2, 1945
Battle-weary Marine: Relieved from the front lines after 12 days of fighting the enemy in Okinawa is Marine Private First Class Harry Kizierian, June 2, 1945

Before the start of the war in the Pacific, Japan attacked Peal Harbor, the American military base located on the island of Oahu in Hawaii, because America had stopped trade of oil and other materials to Japan. After this surprise attack, the US declared war on Japan on December 8, 1941 – one day after the attack – and joined the conflict. This marked the beginning of World War II in the Pacific Theatre.

A demolition crew from the 6th Marine Division watches dynamite charges explode and destroy a Japanese cave. Okinawa, May 1945
A demolition crew from the 6th Marine Division watches dynamite charges explode and destroy a Japanese cave. Okinawa, May 1945

In 1942, the Japanese Empire was operating at the peak of its powers, attacking and occupying positions throughout the Pacific Ocean, ranging from Alaska to India. In a bid to stem the Japanese advance, the US military decided on a strategy of ‘island-hopping’ – fighting for control of strategic islands along a path toward the Japanese home islands, bringing American bombers within range and preparing for a possible invasion. The battles were bloody and conditions for prisoners-of-war were woeful. Japanese soldiers fought the island landings fiercely, killing many Allied soldiers and sometimes making desperate, last-ditch suicidal attacks. By early 1945, leapfrogging US forces had advanced as far as Iwo Jima and Okinawa, within 340 miles of mainland Japan, at a great cost to both sides. On Okinawa alone, during 82 days of fighting, about 100,000 Japanese troops and 12,510 Americans were killed, and somewhere between 42,000 and 150,000 Okinawan civilians died as well. Eventually the war would cease after the US detonated two nuclear weapons over the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6 and 9, 1945, respectively. It was the first time atomic weapons were used in warfare and resulted in the death of about 200,000 people (although estimates vary widely).

 African American Marines, attached to the Third Ammunition Company, in Saipan. Riding the captured bicycle is Pfc. Horace Boykin with, from left, Cpl. Willis T. Anthony, Pfc. Emmitt Shackelford, and Pfc. Eugene Purdy in June 1944. The Battle of Saipan was the first time black US Marines saw action in World War II
African American Marines, attached to the Third Ammunition Company, in Saipan. Riding the captured bicycle is Pfc. Horace Boykin with, from left, Cpl. Willis T. Anthony, Pfc. Emmitt Shackelford, and Pfc. Eugene Purdy in June 1944. The Battle of Saipan was the first time black US Marines saw action in World War II
 Injured prisoners shown surrounded by American troops
Injured prisoners shown surrounded by American troops
 A Japanese tank and soldiers. Honour-bound, many Japanese soldiers fought to the death rather than surrender
A Japanese tank and soldiers. Honour-bound, many Japanese soldiers fought to the death rather than surrender
 Heads bowed at the burial of Private First Class Mike Fenton, Okinawa, in May 1945. Fenton was killed in a Japanese counterattack
Heads bowed at the burial of Private First Class Mike Fenton, Okinawa, in May 1945. Fenton was killed in a Japanese counterattack
 A ruined Japanese tank smoulders in the background
A ruined Japanese tank smoulders in the background
 US troops hold a Japanese flag captured in July 1944 during the Battle of Saipan
US troops hold a Japanese flag captured in July 1944 during the Battle of Saipan
 USS Tennessee bombards Okinawa with her enormous guns, as troops are carried to the invasion beaches
USS Tennessee bombards Okinawa with her enormous guns, as troops are carried to the invasion beaches
 Tanks on Okinawa work with the 96th Infantry Division on April 1, 1945. The battle was gruesome but paved the way for an allied victory in the region
Tanks on Okinawa work with the 96th Infantry Division on April 1, 1945. The battle was gruesome but paved the way for an allied victory in the region
U.S. Marines of the 28th Regiment of the Fifth Division raise the American flag atop Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima circa 23 February 1945 (Joe Rosenthal)
U.S. Marines of the 28th Regiment of the Fifth Division raise the American flag atop Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima circa 23 February 1945 (Joe Rosenthal)

Source: Media Drum Images/ Royston Leonard

 

Manson Murders ’69

Charles Manson et al. wearing costumes: Charles Manson is escorted to court for a preliminary hearing on Dec. 3, 1969, in Los Angeles
Charles Manson et al. wearing costumes: Charles Manson is escorted to court for a preliminary hearing on Dec. 3, 1969, in Los Angeles

In Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood, one of the most infamous crimes of the 20th century plays a prominent role: though the movie’s story is fictionalised, Margot Robbie plays Sharon Tate, the real actor who was a victim of the 1969 murders committed by followers of the cult leader Charles Manson.

A half-century after Tate’s death, there remain plenty of myths and theories about why Manson’s followers carried out the murders — and one of the biggest questions is the extent to which Charles Manson himself was involved, and why.
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July 20 1969 – 2019 The Eagle Landed Fifty Years Ago

Blue Crescent Moon
Houston. Tranquillity Base Here.., The Eagle Has Landed. ‘ 


50 years ago, NASA’s Apollo 11 mission changed our world and ideas of what is possible by successfully landing humans on the surface of the moon—and bringing them home safely—for the first time in history. The video celebrates this moment of human achievement by taking us through the journey to the moon and back, narrated by someone with firsthand knowledge of the epic event: former astronaut and Apollo 11 command module pilot Michael Collins.

Source
Apollo11~Wikipedia Continue reading “July 20 1969 – 2019 The Eagle Landed Fifty Years Ago”

Brian Jones Town Massacre

jungle-heart-of-darkness
Rev. Jim Jones
Rev. Jim Jones

This audio recording below known as the Jonestown Massacre Death Tape ~ FBI No. Q 042  is the last 30 minutes before in Jonestown, Guyana in west Africa on November 18, 1978, nearly 1000, including 200 children who were murdered by the cult,all Americans, brainwashed by the Rev. Jim Jones, who he’d convinced as the members of his insane quasi-religious-cult; ‘The Peoples Temple’ to kill themselves due to fears of that he and his followers had been infiltrated by the United States FBI and he claimed, due his unstable paranoid state of mind, they were all to be liquidated and he himself assassinated by the American government. The Jamestown massacre, that followed a visit from Congressman Leo Ryan, due to concerns from the cult members family back home in the US, Congressman Ryan who had sparked the panic by his appearance at the cults secret hideout in West Africa, was murdered by cult members at the Guyana air port as he tried to return home to the USA, along with 4 other Americans on that day in November, 1978. Whitch  is said in the US; to have been the largest mass suicide in recorded modern-day history.
Please click the play button below to hear more ..,Warning: You my find some of the recording disturbing.


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Sir Winston Churchill

Churchill on America Britains World War Two Victorious Leader
Portrait of Sir Winston Churchill: Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed to so Few - The embodiment, incarnate.of that indomitable British Bull-dog spirit Which was clearly demonstrated during World War Two
Portrait of Sir Winston Churchill: Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed to so Few – The embodiment, incarnate.of that indomitable British Bull-dog spirit Which was clearly demonstrated during World War Two


Sir Winston Churchill
Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was a British statesman, army officer, and writer. He was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945, when he led Britain to victory in the Second World War, and again from 1951 to 1955.
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Fourth of July

United States of America - The Stars & Stripes - Flag

Well,  well! The Fourth of July!
‘Have a Nice Day’ Everyone in the United States! We all hope ‘Ya’ll’ have fun today and you enjoy your mom’s apple pie with your Budweiser beer and a couple of Jack Daniel’s & Coca Colas whilst you guys watch the fireworks.

Flag of the English - Americas - Colonies - Confederate ~1750s
Flag of the English North American colonies – The Confederation of America -13 Atlantic Coast States – circa mid-1700s

America is celebrated its Independence from Britain in the 18th. Century today. I think it was the late 1770s, or the early 1780s. Well, 1776 to be exact, when George Washington declared the American colony’s independence from their English colonial masters.  After fighting the Brits extremely bravely with some assistance from those little tossers the French, won overall victory in the War of Independence or, The American Revolution. And, deservedly gained independence as a nation state in its own right. Freed from the evil, tight grip of its colonist masters, some say half-insane English King George III Who reluctantly agreed to sign the Paris Peace Treaty in September, 1783. International recognition of the colony’s political and New-World status as a fully independent, Land-of-the-Free, federalist-republican & democratically based nation or United State. What’s now known as:
The United States of America.’

Emanuel Leutzes Iconic historical Image of George Washington Crossing The River Delaware to Bravely Fight The British Continental Army and Win Independence for America.
Washington Crossing the Delaware by Emanuel Leutze

There then followed a dramatic political and social event in the English speaking and in world history; the very ‘raison d’être’ of the American Dream. – ‘Sacrosanct’ in the US, untouchable by any future corrupt political party or tyrannical party politician – even today.
‘No Taxation Without Representation’ was the basis of why the American English colonists under Washington fought the war and won. Ensuring the birth of a nation: ~ The United States of America as fully independent-federalist-republican and a freely-democratic nation in its own rights.
Confirmed soon after with an immensely important declaration of its citizens  ‘Inalienable Rights’ in the historical & legendary signing of The American Constitution.

In battles such as Bunker Hill in Boston (which I have visited) and on the River Delaware ensured that Britain’s most prized colony, namely: the United States of America, now the richest most powerful nation in the world, was freed from the tight, evil grip of the crazy King George III of England.

BThe Battle of Bunker Hill was fought on June 17, 1775, during the Siege of Boston in the early stages of the American Revolutionary War. The battle is named after Bunker Hill in Charlestown, Massachusetts, which was peripherally involved in the battle
Battle of Bunker Hill – June 17, 1775 ~ Charlestown in present day city of Boston, Massachusetts ~ USA

I’ve visited some of the old battlefields, watched most of the movies and read some of the books on that, one of the most interesting and pivotal times in history. One of the few times the British army has ever been defeated in battle. One other occasion was in the Suez Crisis in the 1950’s. When it sadly became apparent that Britain was no longer a world power. After hundreds of years of world dominance, Britain and England were no longer a superpower. Why was this the case ? You may ask yourself … Well its mostly to do with the USA and the two world wars of the 20th. Century. War is an essential part of history, economics, social order, politics, race relations and religion. Not to mention world power and geopolitics.

Two world wars within the last century have crippled England and the old, now dead, British Empire. Which was the most powerful nation and Empire on the planet at the turn of the last Century. The sun never set on the Great British Empire and most of the world map was coloured purple.
From the whole of North America in the west. South Africa and Rhodesia in southern Africa. In the middle east: Palestine and Egypt. In Asia, India: “The Star in The Crown of The British Empire” (and now the world’s largest democracy) and in the far east: Singapore, Malaysia and Hong Kong. To name but a few.
(Oh, I forget our massive colony of Australia! [and New Zealand] Well it’s miles away from anywhere and full of x-criminals!).It was these nations of ‘The Commonwealth’ who helped save the British Empire on several occasions during the 20th. Century.North America (USA & Canada) and a few other ‘English Speaking’ countries, who were still part of the Great British Empire or Commonwealth, helped save the British and it’s Empire in both world wars. Or, did they?
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America & the WW2 Air-war over Europe

The USAAF WW2 'Airwar over Europe' Boeing B17 Flying Fortress bomber
The USAAF WW2 ‘Air-war over Europe’ The Boeing B17 Flying Fortress American bomber

The English speaking Allied air-raid bombing of Germany by ’44 reached in excess of 1000 bombers per raid in endless and successive waves, both day and night, in a-all-out total land and air war in Europe post-44. With 1000s and 1000s, both military and non-military, Axis targets attacked and destroyed-a-day in all the occupied territories of Europe and, most destructively in Germany itself. In huge air raids – 1000s of bombers and 1000s of fighters at a time.
The Americans in their Boeing B17 Flying-Fortress and P51 Mustang fighter escorts by day – and the British RAF pilots in their Lancaster and Halifax bombers with night fighter escorts during night air raid missions.
These missions, however, carried a high price, especially for the American USAAF Eighth Air Force stationed in southeastern England.
Half of the U.S. Army Air Force’s casualties in World War II were suffered by Eighth Air Force (more than 47,000 casualties, with more than 26,000 dead). Seventeen Medals of Honor went to Eighth Air Force personnel during the war. By war’s end, they had been awarded a number of other medals to include 220 Distinguished Service Crosses, and 442,000 Air Medals. Many more awards were made to Eighth Air Force veterans after the war that remain uncounted. There were 261 fighter aces in the Eighth Air Force during World War II. Thirty-one of these aces had 15 or more aircraft kills apiece. Another 305 enlisted gunners were also recognised as aces.

The Biggest Bombing Raid of World War II: USAAF 8th Air Force Sent 1000 B17 Bombers to Destroy Berlin
The Biggest Bombing Raid of World War II: USAAF 8th Air Force Sent 1000 B17 Bombers to Destroy Berlin

Some say, controversially..,  that the losses hitting civilian targets next to the German Nazi war machine industrial targets were far too great. Yet, as crucial to the defeat of Hitler and the evil Nazis as the land war in the East. The English speaking Allied land war as seen soon after D-Day June, 1944 often faltered. In Normandy, northern France and in the Low countries especially on their home soil of the Fatherland, it was so bitterly fought over by the German Eastern Front battle hardened fanatical SS soldiers and co. it often thwarted, advanced no more than a mile or two a day.., or ended in retreat – or, even defeat. In the Rhineland for example in enemy held territories it ended in defeat and forced the British at least into a humiliating retreat. British Field Marshal Monty’s Operation: ‘Market Garden’ Arnhem, Holland in September ’44 .., regardless of the brave actions by the men of the British Parachute Regiment, the British army went a Bridge-too-Far  and it remains one of the worst military ‘British Blunders’ of WW2. Failing to capture an intact bridgehead over the River Rhine into Germany and an open road to Berlin.
The ongoing ariel bombardment of Berlin and industrial heartlands of the Nazi Fatherland, such as the Ruhr by the USAAF 8th Air Force and the RAF British Bomber Command under Harris ensured the English speaking Allies appeased and paid their very considerable burdens in men and materials in the inevitable destruction of Hitler and the Nazi war machine as well as the American and British armies commitments & considerable sacrifices on the Post-D-Day Second Front land war.
Ensuring Roosevelt and Churchill avoided the venomous wraith and ever worsening threat of continued hostilities after V. E. Day by Russia. The enormous threat of violence of the oldest enemy of the west: The Russian – ‘Great Bear.’ Then under the full control of that evil tyrant, leader of the Communist party, Hitler’s old foe: Josef Stalin. Whom we pacified by the combination of the English speaking Allied land War. And, crucially by America’s ‘Air-war over Europe’ and some say brutal bombing of Nazi Germany in WW2.

Continue reading “America & the WW2 Air-war over Europe”

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