Talken News

Donner meat-mad-man
Talke is a village in Staffordshire, England, four miles north-west of Newcastle-under-Lyme.
Talke is a village in Staffordshire, England, four miles north-west of Newcastle-under-Lyme.

The village of Talke is in Staffordshire, England, four miles north-west of Newcastle-under-Lyme. There once was a fruit and veg. shop and Post Office called ‘Vince’s.’  This store or typically northerners 1970s con-vience shop was in Unity Way, Talke. Which was, and still is in a rather shabby council estate built in the 1970’s. Full of unemployed young men abusing and selling drugs, over-weight single mothers on state benefits and the location of Vince’s rather disgusting cockroach-rat-infested shop full of out-of-date shite food that the locals snapped up at Vince’s super-lowest-low-prices!‘Get-it-while-u-can!’ he would shout out around the streets of Talke from his jam packed shitty little van full of crap food and stuffed full of other bollox you didn’t really want! But, he some how managed get you buy it off him! The Cunt! Vince’s other favourite saying and key to his business success of his shop and life-long motto of his v. v. surprising and rather amazingly long existence as a very dodgy food retailer and a credit to his rather unusual business acumen was:
“Where There’s Mold? There’s GOLD!”

It was open during the 1980’s and early 1990’s. After which it closed. Thank F.! Probably after a Health & Safety law violation and inevitable inspection by a local government Environmental Health Officer. Who most probably, and almost certainly, condemned the place and had Vince’s fruit & veg. shop shut down with immediate effect! And then had Vince banged up for 50 years for breaking every F.in’ Consumer Health act and local and national government’s directives and laws on food hygiene and consumer protection since the F.in’ early 1820’s!Vince’s old shop is now ‘Manhattan Pizza.’ A rather horrible, Pakistani fast-food outlet selling over priced 32″ inch Pizzas, horrible greasy, v. soggy, & v. thin French fries and disgusting Donner Kebabs to all  the TV coach potatoes in the local area and in the vicinity of Unity Way council estate.Donner Kebabs consist of one small pita bread stuffed full with the most fowl mix of dog-food like Donner ‘meat’ (If u can call that shite meat!) cabbage, so called ‘mixed salads’ and other bollox.

All christened with the most fowl super red-hot chilli sauce. That only absolute idiots or, pissed out of their minds nut-bags would dare ever attempt to put in their mouths. Or, even contemplate eating. As it burns the F. out of your throat and sets fire to your belly, as well as the horrid greasy Donner meat food poisoning you are most certainly gonna experience soon after the consumption of a Donner Kebab dirt-box on a post-piss-up-take-away-filthy-feed. As it is left spit roasting for days. Vertically. Like some deranged elephant’s foot or lower leg. Going round and around for days.
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Total War ~ WWII in the Pacific ~ 1942 ~ 45

American supplies being landed at Iwo Jima
Pacific February 1942 – July 1945
Episode 23 – The World At War
American supplies being landed at Iwo Jima
American supplies being landed at Iwo Jima
37mm Gun fires against cave positions at Iwo Jima
37mm Gun fires against cave positions at Iwo Jima
 Injured US Marines being treated on the sand, at an aid station on Iwo Jima (Iwo To), one of the Japanese volcanic islands, in 1945
Injured US Marines being treated on the sand, at an aid station on Iwo Jima (Iwo To), one of the Japanese volcanic islands, in 1945
US Marines capture Japanese flags on Pacific Island of Iwo Jima in the War in the Pacific in February 1945
US Marines capture Japanese flags on Pacific Island of Iwo Jima in the War in the Pacific in February 1945
U.S. Marines of the 28th Regiment of the Fifth Division raise the American flag atop Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima circa 23 February 1945 (Joe Rosenthal)
U.S. Marines  raise the American flag atop Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima February 1945

 

 Lt Walter Chewning, a catapult officer, is shown climbing up the side of a F6F to help the pilot, Ens. Byron Johnson, out of the flaming cockpit, after a crash landing on the flight deck of the USS Enterprise. The vessel was en route to attack Makin Island in the Pacific, November 1943
Lt Walter Chewning, a catapult officer, is shown climbing up the side of a F6F to help the pilot, Ens. Byron Johnson, out of the flaming cockpit, after a crash landing on the flight deck of the USS Enterprise. The vessel was en route to attack Makin Island in the Pacific, November 1943 
 American soldiers pictured alongside a rescued Japanese child in Saipan, July 1944
American soldiers pictured alongside a rescued Japanese child in Saipan, July 1944
 Working cautiously near heavily damaged tanks, a California National Guardsman methodically sweeps for mines
Working cautiously near heavily damaged tanks, a California National Guardsman methodically sweeps for mines
 Emerging with his hands held in the air, this man was the first of 20 Japanese to come out of a cave on Iwo Jima, on April 5, 1945. The group had been hiding for several days
Emerging with his hands held in the air, this man was the first of 20 Japanese to come out of a cave on Iwo Jima, on April 5, 1945. The group had been hiding for several days
 Pictured in July 1944, troops and vehicles en route for the invasion of Cape Sansapor, New Guinea
Pictured in July 1944, troops and vehicles en route for the invasion of Cape Sansapor, New Guinea
 The Battle of Okinawa in April-June 1945: US Marines take cover while a Bazooka operator looks for a target
The Battle of Okinawa in April-June 1945: US Marines take cover while a Bazooka operator looks for a target
 Flamethrower troops engulf a barren hillside with fire
Flamethrower troops engulf a barren hillside with fire
 Battle-weary Marine: Relieved from the front lines after 12 days of fighting the enemy in Okinawa is Marine Private First Class Harry Kizierian, June 2, 1945
Battle-weary Marine: Relieved from the front lines after 12 days of fighting the enemy in Okinawa is Marine Private First Class Harry Kizierian, June 2, 1945

Before the start of the war in the Pacific, Japan attacked Peal Harbor, the American military base located on the island of Oahu in Hawaii, because America had stopped trade of oil and other materials to Japan. After this surprise attack, the US declared war on Japan on December 8, 1941 – one day after the attack – and joined the conflict. This marked the beginning of World War II in the Pacific Theatre.

A demolition crew from the 6th Marine Division watches dynamite charges explode and destroy a Japanese cave. Okinawa, May 1945
A demolition crew from the 6th Marine Division watches dynamite charges explode and destroy a Japanese cave. Okinawa, May 1945

In 1942, the Japanese Empire was operating at the peak of its powers, attacking and occupying positions throughout the Pacific Ocean, ranging from Alaska to India. In a bid to stem the Japanese advance, the US military decided on a strategy of ‘island-hopping’ – fighting for control of strategic islands along a path toward the Japanese home islands, bringing American bombers within range and preparing for a possible invasion. The battles were bloody and conditions for prisoners-of-war were woeful. Japanese soldiers fought the island landings fiercely, killing many Allied soldiers and sometimes making desperate, last-ditch suicidal attacks. By early 1945, leapfrogging US forces had advanced as far as Iwo Jima and Okinawa, within 340 miles of mainland Japan, at a great cost to both sides. On Okinawa alone, during 82 days of fighting, about 100,000 Japanese troops and 12,510 Americans were killed, and somewhere between 42,000 and 150,000 Okinawan civilians died as well. Eventually the war would cease after the US detonated two nuclear weapons over the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6 and 9, 1945, respectively. It was the first time atomic weapons were used in warfare and resulted in the death of about 200,000 people (although estimates vary widely).

 African American Marines, attached to the Third Ammunition Company, in Saipan. Riding the captured bicycle is Pfc. Horace Boykin with, from left, Cpl. Willis T. Anthony, Pfc. Emmitt Shackelford, and Pfc. Eugene Purdy in June 1944. The Battle of Saipan was the first time black US Marines saw action in World War II
African American Marines, attached to the Third Ammunition Company, in Saipan. Riding the captured bicycle is Pfc. Horace Boykin with, from left, Cpl. Willis T. Anthony, Pfc. Emmitt Shackelford, and Pfc. Eugene Purdy in June 1944. The Battle of Saipan was the first time black US Marines saw action in World War II
 Injured prisoners shown surrounded by American troops
Injured prisoners shown surrounded by American troops
 A Japanese tank and soldiers. Honour-bound, many Japanese soldiers fought to the death rather than surrender
A Japanese tank and soldiers. Honour-bound, many Japanese soldiers fought to the death rather than surrender
 Heads bowed at the burial of Private First Class Mike Fenton, Okinawa, in May 1945. Fenton was killed in a Japanese counterattack
Heads bowed at the burial of Private First Class Mike Fenton, Okinawa, in May 1945. Fenton was killed in a Japanese counterattack
 A ruined Japanese tank smoulders in the background
A ruined Japanese tank smoulders in the background
 US troops hold a Japanese flag captured in July 1944 during the Battle of Saipan
US troops hold a Japanese flag captured in July 1944 during the Battle of Saipan
 USS Tennessee bombards Okinawa with her enormous guns, as troops are carried to the invasion beaches
USS Tennessee bombards Okinawa with her enormous guns, as troops are carried to the invasion beaches
 Tanks on Okinawa work with the 96th Infantry Division on April 1, 1945. The battle was gruesome but paved the way for an allied victory in the region
Tanks on Okinawa work with the 96th Infantry Division on April 1, 1945. The battle was gruesome but paved the way for an allied victory in the region
U.S. Marines of the 28th Regiment of the Fifth Division raise the American flag atop Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima circa 23 February 1945 (Joe Rosenthal)
U.S. Marines of the 28th Regiment of the Fifth Division raise the American flag atop Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima circa 23 February 1945 (Joe Rosenthal)

Source: Media Drum Images/ Royston Leonard

 

The End of the War in Europe – 1944 ~ 45

Things got pretty nasty towards the end of nazi Germany. here Polish pows are murdered by firing squad as the nazis pull-out in Poland and all eastern front countries - 1944-1945
Things got pretty nasty towards the end of nazi Germany. Here Polish pows are murdered by firing squad as the nazis pull-out in Poland and all eastern front countries – 1944-1945
24 January 1945: The Red Army races across Poland to the German border. The troops of the 10th Tank Corps 5th Guards Tank Army 2nd Belorussian Front occupied city
24 January 1945: The Red Army races across Poland to the German border. The troops of the 10th Tank Corps 5th Guards Tank Army 2nd Belorussian Front



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Veni Vidi Vici ~ I came I saw I conquered Julius Ceasers Failed Invasion of Britannia in 55 BC

The Seven Sisters chalk cliffs and coastguard cottages, South Downs Way, South Downs National Park, East Sussex, England, UK

Julius Caesar landed in Britain on August 26th, 55 BC.
Veni ~ Vidi ~ Vici ?! I came, I saw, I conquered?!

'I came, I saw, I conquered.' Julius Caesar circa 47 BC
‘I came, I saw, I conquered.’ Julius Caesar circa 47 BC

He came.., yeah, He saw, too true! But he certainly didn’t conquer us here in the UK! In 55 BC his planned Invasion of what the Romans called ‘Britannia’ Julius Ceaser completely failed to invade fortress Britain and left empty handed and went back home to Rome without any plunder, slaves or brave tales of Ulysses. I believe he’d probably have said just like the Welsh writer GBS – George Bernard Shaw said of the Giants Causeway in Northern Ireland ~ and Ireland was one place the Romans never ever  bothered going to see for they never set foot on Irish soil in their long history or in the very least never ever settled or lived there. (The same good reason why like millions of others in Ireland then, my forefathers left for London,England over 100 years ago to start a new life here). He may have said to save pride to his Friends Romans & Citizens as did George Bernard Shaw of the Giants Causeway in Northern Ireland:

‘Worth Seeing. Not Worth Going To Sea.’

The de facto – pardon the pun –  forgive me for my awful Latin, (which I’ve never unfortunately to my own demise, studied at school). The Latin phrase I think, possibly, maybe, correct me if I’m wrong.., should read more like this:
Veni, Vidi, ~ Et non Feci Vici Britania ~ de facto Romanes Eunt Domus!
I came, I saw,  Didn’t Conquer Britannia ~ in fact The Romans Went Home!

And didn’t return for over 100 years. Until the Roman Emperor Claudius over one hundred years later in 43 AD., Who after a very long hard fight with the barbaric tribes of Britainia with a huge invasion fleet and massive army from all over the Roman Empire the largest ever amassed in the ancient world.., who eventually conquered the British tribes well over 100 years later with no easy short battle of the kind battle Julius Ceaser was accustomed.

A Gaulish chieftain named Commius was sent across the Channel to enlist support for the Romans among the British tribes, while a trusted officer took a fast galley to reconnoitre the coast. Caesar assembled eighty ships at Boulogne to carry two legions, the Seventh and the Tenth, plus irregulars, altogether some 12,000 men. The cavalry and their horses were to sail separately from Ambleteuse, a few miles north. After waiting for a wind the Roman ships left Boulogne in the early hours of August 26th and came in sight of the white cliffs of Dover around 9am. The cliffs were bristling with menacing British warriors, horsemen and war chariots. It was obviously no place to land, but Caesar waited for hours offshore for the cavalry, which had got penned in Ambleteuse by tide and wind. In the afternoon the Roman fleet sailed north-east without them to pass the South Foreland and come in sight of the long stretch of flat shore to the north. The Britons moved along on land to keep pace.The Roman ships drew in and anchored offshore, probably about where Deal is now, and the legionaries were faced with wading to land, burdened with weapons and gear, while the Britons threw javelins at them and galloped menacingly to and fro on the beach. It was not an agreeable prospect and the soldiers hung back until the eagle-bearer of the Tenth jumped into the sea and shouted to his comrades to follow him and defend the standard. This they did and more and more of the Romans struggled through the waves to the beach. After savage fighting, the legionaries managed to form up, charge the Britons and drive them in flight. With no cavalry this could not be followed up and the Romans made camp.

Roman Roads of Britain - Britannia - circa 150 AD
Roman Roads of Britain – Britannia – circa 150 AD


The Britons sent emissaries to Caesar to sue for peace, along with Commius with his tail between his legs. Caesar took hostages from them and after four days, on the 30th, the cavalry transports at last appeared, but were blown away by a sudden fierce storm and forced back to Gaul. The gale coincided with an exceptionally high tide and many of Caesar’s ships dragged their anchors and were wrecked on the beach. The Britons took note and started to muster their forces again. The Romans began repairing the ships, but now they were short of food. Parties ventured into the countryside to reap corn and gather supplies, but legionaries of the Seventh were ambushed by British chariots and horsemen. Fortunately for the Romans, the attack raised such a cloud of dust that Caesar saw it from the camp and hurried up with reinforcements. After several days of incessant rain Caesar managed to bring the British to a pitched battle, which was what Roman commanders always wanted against a barbarian and comparatively undisciplined enemy. The British were defeated with heavy casualties, but again could not be effectively pursued. Caesar had had enough. He embarked his men on the ships and sailed back to Gaul.

Caesar tried again the following year, launching a stronger and better prepared force of five legions on a second expedition, which carried him across the Thames at Brentford, but again the weather was abominable and gales played havoc with his ships and supplies. After concluding a face-saving treaty with the local British king he returned to Gaul once more. It was almost another hundred years before the Romans actually conquered Britain, in 43 AD.

Rommel, Monty and the Battle of El Alamein ~ November, 1942

Erwin-Rommel and staff - Western-Desert 1941

British 8th Army infantry soldiers attack the the German defences in the infamous Battle of El Alamein in the Egyptian Western Desert circa December, 1942
British 8th Army infantry soldiers attack German defences in the infamous Battle of El Alamein in the Egyptian Western Desert circa November, 1942

Now this is not the end. It is not even the beginning of the end. But it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning.
Sir Winston Churchill ~ November, a 
very famous WW2 quote after victory for the British in The Second battle of El Alamein in Egypt during the North African campaign. The British General Montgomery led 8th. British Army ‘Desert Rats’ won the British armies first ever victory over German army in WW2.  The Ace Tank Commander German General Erwin Rommel’s led Axis army and  his beloved and infamous Africa Corps elite soldiers lost the Second Battle of El Alamein ~ November, 1942. Defeating the pride of Germany’s Wehrmacht Army Rommel’s Afrika Korps in an historic British Military victory over the German Nazis in WW2. During in the latter stages of the North African Campaign in November, 1942.

Sir Winston Churchill posses for the press in a British Empire Kangol hate in the prelude to the Second Battle of El Alamein in Egypt, circa December, 1942 during North African Campaign
Sir Winston Churchill posses for the press in a British Empire Kangol hat in the prelude to the Second Battle of El Alamein in the Western Desert in Egypt, circa November, 1942 during the North African Campaign

Churchill was so relieved  at Montgomery’s victory over Rommel’s Africa Corps in North Africa he ordered the church bells to be rung all over Britain. The prime minister had been under intense political and personal pressure to secure a decisive victory over the “Desert Fox” who, for 18 months, had persistently outsmarted the British Eighth Army on a desolate and blood-soaked battlefield.
The second battle of El Alamein in western Egypt desert saw the Eighth Army under Montgomery punching holes Axis defences and defeat for Rommel led Axis forces and the infamous elite Africa Corps.

Field Marshal Erwin Rommel -Ace Tank commander in the North Africa campaign and commander-in-chief of the well respected elite German army Africa Corps in Libya, Egypt and Tunisia during the North Africa campaign from 1940 until 1943
Field Marshal Erwin Rommel -Ace Tank commander in the North African campaign and commander-in-chief of the well respected  elite Afrika Korps of the German Wehrmacht  army in Libya, Egypt and Tunisia during the North African Campaign ~ 1940 -’43

Following the fall of Tobruk in June 1942 – a humiliation that prompted a surge of national resentment – Churchill’s critics inspired a no-confidence debate in the House of Commons. Although their target emerged virtually unscathed, the formidable Aneurin Bevan reflected a widespread feeling when he declared waspishly, “The prime minister wins debate after debate and loses battle after battle.” The jibe cut deep.

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The World at War

The World at War is probably, in my modest yet quite well informed opinion on the subject, the best documentary on WW2 ever made.
Produced by Jeremy Isaacs and narrated by Laurence Olivier; The World at War was commissioned by Thames Television first shown in the early 1970s on the UK TV station: ITV. Voted by industry professionals at the time and still thought of as one of the best ever documentaries on World War Two ever made.
‘The World at War’ – Thames Television 1973 Episode 21 – ‘Nemesis: Germany’ (February – May 1945) :-

Nemesis: Germany – February-May 1945. The closing weeks of the European war bring retribution for Germany in the form of carpet bombing cities like Dresden, the collapse of the Whermacht, atrocities by Soviet forces, and finally the fall of Berlin and suicide of Hitler. 
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Not Just Any Road

OS - Ordnance Survey Map of Talke

The village of Talke is a north Staffordshire rural settlement some five miles north-west of the market town of Newcastle under Lyme.

The village had an important place in early medieval England (possibly much earlier in Britain’s history) on account of a major transport route running through this tiny village.

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D-Day

maxresdefaultAs we in the West celebrate and pay tribute to the remaining veterans, possibly for one of the last times, of ‘Operation Overlord’ the invasion of Normandy, the 6th. of June 1944,  which took place 75 years ago today..,  let’s look back and see why many historians of world affairs include this as an extremely important episode in the fight against the pure destructive evil force of Adolf Hitler and the Nazi war machine. And why if not for the sacrifices made by so many Allied troops and considered so acutely important the Allied leaders and their military advisers planned the largest land, sea and air combined military operation the world has ever seen so meticulously and with such amazing fore thought and brilliance that nothing was left to chance and everything, well nearly everything as a consequence went exactly as it were planned.
An outstanding successful military operation that even today we here in the West 75 years on, democracy and freedom still thrives here in the UK and in most of Europe and the rest of the democratic nations of the modern world (be it often threatened) ‘So much owed by so many to so few.’

d-day-invasion-map
D-Day invasion map 6th of June 1944

I visited Normandy during the 70th anniversary of D-day and the invasion of the Normandy beaches 5 years ago. My mother, God bless her soul, treated me to an all expenses paid trip of a lifetime to see the battlefields around Caen, Bayeux and the Normandy coast.The beaches of Normandy is where on June the 6th., 1944, the British, American, Canadian, French and Polish troops stormed into Europe in an invasion that included 3 million men and 100’s of 1,000’s of 1,000,000’s of dollars worth of equipment in what was history’s most ambitious battle and the biggest ever amphibious and aerial invasion the world has ever seen.It became clear on my trip to France, clear that the ‘Invasion of Normandy’ – ‘D-Day,’ the 6th. of June 1944, was Britain’s and America’s finest moment in military history.
Epic! Historical! Legend!
It will be told for centuries as the time when the English speaking world made its dramatic entrance into Europe and displayed its ultimate superiority and dominance in both military action and economic might.

German SS HMG - Heavy Machine Gunner soldiers in typical 1944 combat battledress
German SS HMG – Heavy Machine Gunner soldiers in typical 1944 combat battledress

The poor bloody Germans! We totally annihilated them! We completely outwitted the foolish Prussian and German Generals.

‘The Desert Fox’ – Rommel

Erwin Rommel: The Old ‘Desert Fox’ was completely checkmated in minutes by Eisenhower and Montgomery. It was strategically and militarily a superb success. From the very outset of D-Day, 6th of June 1944, we had the upper hand.

6th. June 1944: ‘Pegasus Bridge,’ Normandy, Northern France.
The very first troops in. Three British Horsa gliders crash land onto marshy backwater land adjacent to the bridge over the river with pinpoint accuracy. Even pitching the nose of the first lead Horsa glider right under the barb wire perimeter defences surrounding the heavily guarded and really important strategic location. The British soldiers took the key strategic ‘Pegasus Bridge’ in just minutes, and held on to it for all of the next day, until they were relieved by the English and Scottish seaborne troops. Who landed on Sword beach many hours later.

The three British Horsa gliders with the distinctive B&W striped markings 6/06/1944 at Pegasus Bridge, Caen Normandy
The three British Horsa gliders with the distinctive B&W striped markings crash land at 0000 hours 6/06/1944 at Pegasus Bridge, Caen Normandy

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Stoke-on-Trents Post-industrial-Neo-implosion

Post-industrial society is imploding and the city of Stoke-on-Trent in North Staffordshire England is suffering from the effect badly

Former Industriouss Stoke-on-Trent .., Nah F.in' Piss-Poor!
Former Industriouss Stoke-on-Trent
The picture above is of a pot bank factory and bottle kiln in Longport (nr. Burslem, Stoke-on-Trent). I personally would love to learn more about one of the best preserved, real working, industrial bastions in the Potteries: Longport, Stoke-on-Trent. As it’s one of my favorite places in this city of ours and remains one of the only few real working pottery towns / village left in North Staffordshire.

Everywhere else in the city is largely populated with call centres and warehouses that provide the only jobs with the countries lowest wages. Stoke-on-Trent is a very economically depressed area in 2019. Britain’s second poorest city, and that’s official.

For centuries this city was a hotbed of creativity and industrious success, hundreds of thousands worked in the ‘Pot Bank’ factories producing some of the world’s finest ceramica.

Josiah Wedgwood (born 1730) was one of it’s great forefathers and based his Wedgwood factory in Etruria at the heart of the city, producing fine ceramics since the 18th. century (and still do at the Barlaston factory nr. Stone in south Staffordshire). His wise acumen and guile, ensured commercial success for his famous ceramics. Josiah Wedgwood was the one of the first men in the entire world to use consumerism-marketing and commercial entrepreneurship. Selling his Wedgwood-ware to the affluent British middle-classes and the rich North Americans.

But that has all changed today. Nothing much is left of this great creative city. All this has nearly been destroyed by those with all the power and money. Much of what is left of the once mighty Potteries and its victims: the working classes, the once: ‘Mighty Potters’ are out on their knees and, nearly all, completely destroyed.

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