Talkes Phoenix

Kidsgrove Workingmen's club - circa late 1980s

Bill Cawley: “Peter Kay is not far out when portrays the strange acts at the Phoenix. I recall vividly the Pakistani stand up comedian who told racist jokes against himself, the asthmatic country and western act from Cleverley who stopped for breath half way through his act.” I’ll be with you in a moment “, or the overloud ear-ringing rock bands. Sometimes there were special events like a boxing tournament at the Suburban where one competitor eschewing the basic defensive stance advanced with arms flaying like a windmill to be quickly demolished by punishing jabs that opened his nose up in a crimson torrent. For the turns themselves there was recognition that there efforts were taken with proper regard. As local act Gerry Stephens writing of the time reportedSaturday was the highlight of the week and people would make an effort to look their best. The Committee officers ran them with a grip of iron and membership were as tightly controlled as any freemasons. Instant silence followed the command ” Give order please” and quiet was demanded- and got- when Bingo started. Bingo was a ritual with its language and actions especially when certain numbers were called out ” Ted’s den- Number Ten, Two fat ladies 88, Leg’s eleven” followed by wolf whistles and the clinking of glasses as pens were banging against them. Sometimes a frustrated gamester would call out to the elderly lady caller ” Shake them up, Elsie” if his numbers were not coming up.Then there were the turns.“You’d arrive outside the Club, grab your gear, and go in. The room would be completely empty. Then people start coming in; the room is packed, and it’s your job to entertain them for the night. You’ve only got your guitar, your voice and your patter, to get them going, gets them laughing.It was quite a thing to be an artist in the 70s, there was a lot of respect shown; the audience wasn’t allowed to come in or go out during a bracket”.But the knell- as it was for the working class- was already tolling for the clubs.”

Bill Cawley: “I was born in Stoke in 1955 and lived and worked in the City. I was a City Councillor from 82-7 and a County Councillor from 97-05. I’m a member of the Green party My heroes are Thomas Paine, HL Mencken, Tom Joad and Ernest Everard..,”

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Stoke-on-Trents Post-industrial-Neo-implosion

Post-industrial society is imploding and the city of Stoke-on-Trent in North Staffordshire England is suffering from the effect badly

Former Industriouss Stoke-on-Trent .., Nah F.in' Piss-Poor!
Former Industriouss Stoke-on-Trent
The picture above is of a pot bank factory and bottle kiln in Longport (nr. Burslem, Stoke-on-Trent). I personally would love to learn more about one of the best preserved, real working, industrial bastions in the Potteries: Longport, Stoke-on-Trent. As it’s one of my favorite places in this city of ours and remains one of the only few real working pottery towns / village left in North Staffordshire.

Everywhere else in the city is largely populated with call centres and warehouses that provide the only jobs with the countries lowest wages. Stoke-on-Trent is a very economically depressed area in 2019. Britain’s second poorest city, and that’s official.

For centuries this city was a hotbed of creativity and industrious success, hundreds of thousands worked in the ‘Pot Bank’ factories producing some of the world’s finest ceramica.

Josiah Wedgwood (born 1730) was one of it’s great forefathers and based his Wedgwood factory in Etruria at the heart of the city, producing fine ceramics since the 18th. century (and still do at the Barlaston factory nr. Stone in south Staffordshire). His wise acumen and guile, ensured commercial success for his famous ceramics. Josiah Wedgwood was the one of the first men in the entire world to use consumerism-marketing and commercial entrepreneurship. Selling his Wedgwood-ware to the affluent British middle-classes and the rich North Americans.

But that has all changed today. Nothing much is left of this great creative city. All this has nearly been destroyed by those with all the power and money. Much of what is left of the once mighty Potteries and its victims: the working classes, the once: ‘Mighty Potters’ are out on their knees and, nearly all, completely destroyed.

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