This Weeks 80 Year Commemoration of the Start of WW2

World War Two was the most devastating tragic and desperate fight for freedom in world history ever. The start of the war in Europe is generally held to be 1 September 1939, beginning with the German invasion of Poland; the United Kingdom of Great Britain and France declared war on Germany two days later.

Sir Winston Churchill
Sir Winston Churchill

By Autumn of 1945 the Western democracies and communist East fought and defeated the Axis Triple Alliance of Germany Italy and Japan. A triumphant victory for the Anglo-American English speaking nations as well as the communist Eastern nations against the purely evil armies of the Triple Alliance of the Axis powers (Germany, Italy and Japan) in Europe, the Atlantic, North Africa, the Pacific Ocean and Asian territories in a huge and tremendously violent and destructive truly world wide conflict. This week world leaders gather in Poland’s capital, Warsaw to commemorate the start of this extremely bloody conflict on the 1st. of September, 1939. When Great Britain and France declared war on the evil dictator Adolf Hitler and his German Nazi controlled super power war-machine after he invaded Poland 80 years ago this week.
An immense struggle ensued with Britain the only combatant who stood alone against Hitler and Mussolini, the Italian Fascist dictator. After the fall of France in the summer of 1940, Winston Churchill, the British war leader made it his sole aim to defeat the Nazi war machine and Hitler with the defence of our nation in tenacious and defiant British bull dog King Henry Fifths longbows-men Battle of Agincourt Two Fingers taunt to the German bully boy fascist Nazi party and completely racist henchmen pigs and it’s purely evil mastermind; Adolf Hitler who reigned supreme in all Europe at the time, with only Britain and her Empire to stop him.

'The Big Three' - left to right: Churchill - Roosevelt - Stalin at The Yalta Conference circa February, 1945,
‘The Big Three’ – left to right: Churchill – Roosevelt – Stalin at The Yalta Conference circa February, 1945

Churchill’s refusal to capitulate and give in with all around him calling for Appeasement, this tremendously brave Anglo-American British aristocrat and world-class statesman of the highest calibre helped saved Western democracy more than any man back then in the early years of World War Two.

What ensued with American and Russian intervention later in the war with huge economic industrial and military Allied superiority was Total Victory in Europe over Italy and Hitlers Germany. And, Victory over Japan in the Pacific and Asia by August 1945. It remains history’s bloodiest ever conflict and a truly World War which witnessed  the estimated deaths of 70–85 million people largely innocent civilians.

talkes-reginald-mitchell-fighter-airctraft-of-world-war-two-ww2-the-supermarine-spitfire
The legendary British Battle of Britain RAF fighter plane The Supermarine Spitfire summer 1940 in WW2

Total War ~ WWII in the Pacific ~ 1942 ~ 45

American supplies being landed at Iwo Jima
Pacific February 1942 – July 1945
Episode 23 – The World At War
American supplies being landed at Iwo Jima
American supplies being landed at Iwo Jima
37mm Gun fires against cave positions at Iwo Jima
37mm Gun fires against cave positions at Iwo Jima
 Injured US Marines being treated on the sand, at an aid station on Iwo Jima (Iwo To), one of the Japanese volcanic islands, in 1945
Injured US Marines being treated on the sand, at an aid station on Iwo Jima (Iwo To), one of the Japanese volcanic islands, in 1945
US Marines capture Japanese flags on Pacific Island of Iwo Jima in the War in the Pacific in February 1945
US Marines capture Japanese flags on Pacific Island of Iwo Jima in the War in the Pacific in February 1945
U.S. Marines of the 28th Regiment of the Fifth Division raise the American flag atop Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima circa 23 February 1945 (Joe Rosenthal)
U.S. Marines  raise the American flag atop Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima February 1945

 

 Lt Walter Chewning, a catapult officer, is shown climbing up the side of a F6F to help the pilot, Ens. Byron Johnson, out of the flaming cockpit, after a crash landing on the flight deck of the USS Enterprise. The vessel was en route to attack Makin Island in the Pacific, November 1943
Lt Walter Chewning, a catapult officer, is shown climbing up the side of a F6F to help the pilot, Ens. Byron Johnson, out of the flaming cockpit, after a crash landing on the flight deck of the USS Enterprise. The vessel was en route to attack Makin Island in the Pacific, November 1943 
 American soldiers pictured alongside a rescued Japanese child in Saipan, July 1944
American soldiers pictured alongside a rescued Japanese child in Saipan, July 1944
 Working cautiously near heavily damaged tanks, a California National Guardsman methodically sweeps for mines
Working cautiously near heavily damaged tanks, a California National Guardsman methodically sweeps for mines
 Emerging with his hands held in the air, this man was the first of 20 Japanese to come out of a cave on Iwo Jima, on April 5, 1945. The group had been hiding for several days
Emerging with his hands held in the air, this man was the first of 20 Japanese to come out of a cave on Iwo Jima, on April 5, 1945. The group had been hiding for several days
 Pictured in July 1944, troops and vehicles en route for the invasion of Cape Sansapor, New Guinea
Pictured in July 1944, troops and vehicles en route for the invasion of Cape Sansapor, New Guinea
 The Battle of Okinawa in April-June 1945: US Marines take cover while a Bazooka operator looks for a target
The Battle of Okinawa in April-June 1945: US Marines take cover while a Bazooka operator looks for a target
 Flamethrower troops engulf a barren hillside with fire
Flamethrower troops engulf a barren hillside with fire
 Battle-weary Marine: Relieved from the front lines after 12 days of fighting the enemy in Okinawa is Marine Private First Class Harry Kizierian, June 2, 1945
Battle-weary Marine: Relieved from the front lines after 12 days of fighting the enemy in Okinawa is Marine Private First Class Harry Kizierian, June 2, 1945

Before the start of the war in the Pacific, Japan attacked Peal Harbor, the American military base located on the island of Oahu in Hawaii, because America had stopped trade of oil and other materials to Japan. After this surprise attack, the US declared war on Japan on December 8, 1941 – one day after the attack – and joined the conflict. This marked the beginning of World War II in the Pacific Theatre.

A demolition crew from the 6th Marine Division watches dynamite charges explode and destroy a Japanese cave. Okinawa, May 1945
A demolition crew from the 6th Marine Division watches dynamite charges explode and destroy a Japanese cave. Okinawa, May 1945

In 1942, the Japanese Empire was operating at the peak of its powers, attacking and occupying positions throughout the Pacific Ocean, ranging from Alaska to India. In a bid to stem the Japanese advance, the US military decided on a strategy of ‘island-hopping’ – fighting for control of strategic islands along a path toward the Japanese home islands, bringing American bombers within range and preparing for a possible invasion. The battles were bloody and conditions for prisoners-of-war were woeful. Japanese soldiers fought the island landings fiercely, killing many Allied soldiers and sometimes making desperate, last-ditch suicidal attacks. By early 1945, leapfrogging US forces had advanced as far as Iwo Jima and Okinawa, within 340 miles of mainland Japan, at a great cost to both sides. On Okinawa alone, during 82 days of fighting, about 100,000 Japanese troops and 12,510 Americans were killed, and somewhere between 42,000 and 150,000 Okinawan civilians died as well. Eventually the war would cease after the US detonated two nuclear weapons over the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6 and 9, 1945, respectively. It was the first time atomic weapons were used in warfare and resulted in the death of about 200,000 people (although estimates vary widely).

 African American Marines, attached to the Third Ammunition Company, in Saipan. Riding the captured bicycle is Pfc. Horace Boykin with, from left, Cpl. Willis T. Anthony, Pfc. Emmitt Shackelford, and Pfc. Eugene Purdy in June 1944. The Battle of Saipan was the first time black US Marines saw action in World War II
African American Marines, attached to the Third Ammunition Company, in Saipan. Riding the captured bicycle is Pfc. Horace Boykin with, from left, Cpl. Willis T. Anthony, Pfc. Emmitt Shackelford, and Pfc. Eugene Purdy in June 1944. The Battle of Saipan was the first time black US Marines saw action in World War II
 Injured prisoners shown surrounded by American troops
Injured prisoners shown surrounded by American troops
 A Japanese tank and soldiers. Honour-bound, many Japanese soldiers fought to the death rather than surrender
A Japanese tank and soldiers. Honour-bound, many Japanese soldiers fought to the death rather than surrender
 Heads bowed at the burial of Private First Class Mike Fenton, Okinawa, in May 1945. Fenton was killed in a Japanese counterattack
Heads bowed at the burial of Private First Class Mike Fenton, Okinawa, in May 1945. Fenton was killed in a Japanese counterattack
 A ruined Japanese tank smoulders in the background
A ruined Japanese tank smoulders in the background
 US troops hold a Japanese flag captured in July 1944 during the Battle of Saipan
US troops hold a Japanese flag captured in July 1944 during the Battle of Saipan
 USS Tennessee bombards Okinawa with her enormous guns, as troops are carried to the invasion beaches
USS Tennessee bombards Okinawa with her enormous guns, as troops are carried to the invasion beaches
 Tanks on Okinawa work with the 96th Infantry Division on April 1, 1945. The battle was gruesome but paved the way for an allied victory in the region
Tanks on Okinawa work with the 96th Infantry Division on April 1, 1945. The battle was gruesome but paved the way for an allied victory in the region
U.S. Marines of the 28th Regiment of the Fifth Division raise the American flag atop Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima circa 23 February 1945 (Joe Rosenthal)
U.S. Marines of the 28th Regiment of the Fifth Division raise the American flag atop Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima circa 23 February 1945 (Joe Rosenthal)

Source: Media Drum Images/ Royston Leonard

 

The End of the War in Europe – 1944 ~ 45

Things got pretty nasty towards the end of nazi Germany. here Polish pows are murdered by firing squad as the nazis pull-out in Poland and all eastern front countries - 1944-1945
Things got pretty nasty towards the end of nazi Germany. Here Polish pows are murdered by firing squad as the nazis pull-out in Poland and all eastern front countries – 1944-1945
24 January 1945: The Red Army races across Poland to the German border. The troops of the 10th Tank Corps 5th Guards Tank Army 2nd Belorussian Front occupied city
24 January 1945: The Red Army races across Poland to the German border. The troops of the 10th Tank Corps 5th Guards Tank Army 2nd Belorussian Front



Continue reading “The End of the War in Europe – 1944 ~ 45”